When Z-day comes, Think Pharmacy

A little while ago, it occurred to me that I hadn't watched many zombie films in my life. I therefore made it a bit of a project to watch a whole load of them. I got myself a mentor (my friend Frankie) and together we perfected the art of walking back from the cinema in a zombie fashion whilst giggling hysterically.

 

I've watched good zombie films, bizarre zombie films, Christmas zombie films, thoughtful zombie films, and absolutely terrible zombie films starring Billy Connelly. So I sort of know the ropes when it comes to the genre. On the advice of Nancy, I started listening to the We're Alive podcast, and now extol the virtues of it to any who will listen. Although I dont recommend listening to The Archers right after it, as you find yourself waiting for zombies to jump out and ruin the Ambridge flower festival.

 

So I've just gotten back from World War Z. It was better than expected, and it managed to squeeze more entertainment than I thought may be possible out of a lab in Wales and Peter Capaldi wearing a jumper. Although I may be biased as I do have a bit of  a thing for Peter Capaldi (and Brad Pitt), so I was happy enough as soon as he arrived on screen. All that was missing was Hugh Laurie. And a better ending. And more gore. And less CGI. And less not realising that with a pen and paper and the camera he could easily get the people in the know to tell him which vial to choose. And wouldn't there be an intercom in a WHO lab with infectious diseases in it anyway?!

 

Anyway, I digress. Aside from all the problems with the film that no one else would probably notice, I did note one shining light in all of the z-day carnage. Brad Pitt, like any good citizen should, Thinks Pharmacy. In need of an emergency supply of a salbutamol inhaler, off he goes to the local, friendly community pharmacy.


I don't think this is much of a spoiler, given apparently pretty much the whole film is in the trailer, but after barging into the supermarket pharmacy (probably unlikely: in real life he would have just coughed loudly and shouted "shop!") he is greeted by a friendly professional, white coated  pharmacist who offers him an NMS consultation. Okay, maybe not. He's wearing  hoody and carrying a gun, but, ever the professional, still manages to give some health advice when handing over three inhalers. "Children grow out of asthma" he says, helpfully, which may be true, but I think is unlikely to be the case by the time the  3 inhalers are used up.


He even link sales, passing over some bottles of what I presume to be paracetamol liquid too. How very helpful.


Its nice to see a pharmacist in a film or TV show doing something other than serial killing, murdering, nearly killing orphans with poison when drunk, or merrily doling out vicodin to Dr House without a prescription. Its nice to see a pharmacist resolutely doing what he can to help. It reminds me of all those stories you see in Chemist and Druggist, where there has been horrendous flooding but the pharmacy staff still manage to open up and do their deliveries in a makeshift canoe. The ones who, despite broken shutters or six foot deep snow or pandemic Ebola still turn up to make sure all the collections are done and the order is put away.


The pharmacist in question doesn't do any WWHAM questioning though. I'm not convinced Which? Would have been very happy with him.


Hxxx