Is SoreFix a sore loser?

Cold sores truly are the devil's work. The pesky little blighters make a habit of cropping up at the worst moment, crushing your self confidence within a mere matter of hours. 

Given that cancelling everything and holing yourself up in a darkened room until it has gone away tends not to be all that practical for most of us, It's no surprise that folk are desperate for something that really works, and fast. I've already written about several other new cold sore products on this here blog, neither of which are the miracle cures they're marketed as. 

Enter Sorefix, a product selling itself as a new all-round product to both treat and prevent cold sores. Interestingly, the manufacturers claim that it even works after the cold sore has come out, which if true would make it a really useful product. 

In case you are too late to prevent a cold sore, SoreFix relieves symptoms such as itching, burning and the blisters on or around the lips and it speeds up the healing process. So prevent feeling embarrassed and choose SoreFix!
— http://www.sorefix.com/sorefix-cold-sore/

Medicine vs Medical Device? 

Once again, this product isn't a medicine. It seems that nearly every new OTC product these days is actually a medical device masquerading as a medicine, and this is no exception. It might look like a medicine, it might be sold in pharmacies, and the manufacturers might even make claims that make it sound like a medicine, but nay, it is in fact a medical device. Essentially, this means that the need for good quality, robust evidence of efficacy before marketing is virtually non-existent. Le sigh.

The evidence   

Usually, the first step in finding evidence for how a product works is to find out what is actually in the product. This is proving quite difficult for Sorefix, as all I can find is some vague statements about "two zinc salts". hmph. Ah well, I shall have to make do with what I can. What i am particularly interested in is the claim that Sorefix can reduce healing times for a cold sore once it is already out. 

The manufacturers themselves don't bother with providing any cursory clinical trial data. This is unusual, and sort of  refreshing in a way; at least they aren't trying to palm off some nonsense animal studies as irrefutable evidence. It does, however, leave me with even less of a start than I normally would have for these sorts of posts. 

A quick Google search found nothing whatsoever, so I delved into the medical literature in a Medline and Embase search to see if there is any studies looking at the effects of zinc on cold sores. As I can't find which exact zinc salts are in the product, I just did a search for zinc. I found a grand total of three results, none of which were relevant. 

I did manage to find some information about the topical use of zinc in a trusted database. It seems that there is some, very limited data which suggests that some specific zinc-containing products, none of which are Sorefix, may reduce the duration of symptoms by a grand total of 1.5 days, and that's only if used within 24 hours of onset. There is also some evidence that zinc isn't effective for recurrent infections, which is probably going to be pretty much everyone. 

So it seems that I can find nothing at all to back up any of the manufacturers claims at this point. I've contacted them to see if they have any further information, and it'll be really interesting to see if I ever get anything back. 

Safety

Safety-wise, it's very difficult to comment on without knowing what exactly is actually in it. The manufacturers say you shouldn't use it if you are very sensitive to any of the ingredients, though of course they don't tell you what they are. Helpful much :S

The practicalities

The key with cold sore treatments is that you need to start using them before they appear, and you need to use them regularly. Despite what the manufacturers seem to be saying, it would appear that this product is no different. It doesn't contain an antiviral, but the limited amount of evidence looking at the effects of zinc for cold sores suggest that it needs to used every two hours in order to have an effect. That's a lot of applications per day, and I think it's unlikely that most people will be able to keep up with it for any reasonable amount of time. It's worth noting that, because cold sores can worsen quickly, this probably does include overnight too.

I really like the idea of having something to use for prevention, but its hard to remember to apply something at the best of times.  Its even harder if you haven't got a throbbing mass of evil reminding you of its presence constantly.  Given the lack of evidence for prevention, there is no specific guidance on how often you are supposed to use it in order to prevent a cold sore, but I suspect its going to have to be very regularly. 

The cost

It costs £7.47 for a jar or tub of this stuff. Although that's quite similar to other new products for cold sores, it's waaay more expensive than generic aciclovir or plain old vaseline. 

So, is it worth a shot? 

At this time, no. I can't see anything to suggest it's any better than existing treatments. I'll be interested to see if I get anything back from the manufacturers, but I can't see any reason why this product would work, and there is certainly no evidence to back up their claims.

Unfortunately, when it comes to cold sores, time is the best healer, especially once they are out and proud.  If it hurts, then use painkillers like paracetamol or ibuprofen. If its still at the tingling stage, go for topical aciclovir, but make sure you get a cheap generic version rather than Zoivirax: its exactly the same stuff. It's not going to make much difference once its already taken hold though, and at this point you're better off just using something like vaseline to keep it as supple as possible. 

Hxxx